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Photo#147753
giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - male

giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - Male
Odiorne State Park, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA
September 22, 2007
Size: 25-30mm incl. forceps
Male's forceps. Notice how one tong curves in more than the other. This is a male characteristic in this family.

Images of this individual: tag all
giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - male - female giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - male - female giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - male giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - male giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - male giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - female giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - female giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - female giant intertidal earwig's prey giant intertidal earwig's prey giant intertidal earwig - Anisolabis maritima - male - female

Oh good to know
Fewf, I collected these guys the other day and thought my biggest male was deformed or something!

Not just "a characteristic"
It's unique to the family (at least for nearctic species) and therefore a useful diagnostic. I added this image to the Anisolabididae guide page under "identification"- thanks!

 
Thank you, Chuck.
I was glad to see you had taken the earwigs under your wing some time back. I'll post the other species soon.

(later) I see we have a great many images if the other species already :-)

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