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Confirmation of Rhopalocera (Pieridae, Nymphalidae) previously recorded for Texas and the United States.
By Kendall, R.O.
Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society 28(3): 249-252., 1974
Cite: 1481998
Full Text

Kendall, R.O. 1974. Confirmation of Rhopalocera (Pieridae, Nymphalidae) previously recorded for Texas and the United States. Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society 28(3): 249-252.

The object of this paper is to remove the dubious status of earlier reports of two species of Lepidoptera being found in Texas. Each species is represented at present by a single example only. Examples of earlier recordings have not been found; it is possible, however, that they do exist.

These species may represent single-brooded migrants which come to Texas from time to time. A precise judgment on this cannot be made until life history studies are conducted. Such studies would disclose critical ecological influences upon each. Another possible conclusion is that they are actually established in our fauna, but at such low population levels that they are seldom encountered by collectors. In any event, based on the good condition of these particular examples, we may conclude that they had not been on the wing long. No major climatic disturbances were involved.