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Photo#1489994
Pyraustine crambid - Anania quebecensis

Pyraustine crambid - Anania quebecensis
Pine Brook, Isanti County, Minnesota, USA
Size: WS (pinned) 19mm
Adult reared from a caterpillar found on cinnamon fern July 30, 2011. Eclosed April 19, 2012. To my eye it best matches Anania quebecensis, which would represent a big reported range extension if true. The larva reached about 16mm and turned bright orange red as a prepupa. I believe I have once before seen the same species on interrupted fern.

Images of this individual: tag all
Pyraustine crambid - Anania quebecensis Pyraustine crambid - Anania quebecensis Pyraustine crambid - Anania quebecensis Pyraustine crambid - Anania quebecensis

Moved
Moved from Pyraustinae.

Moved
Moved from Bailey's Pinion.

Moved
Moved from Quebec Anania.

Moved

 
I realize this move may be co
I realize this move may be controversial due to the considerable extension of reported range. See note to Aaron (below) for explanation. At least this way I might expedite feedback. If DNA analysis or genitalic dissection is needed, the voucher is ready and not too old (like me).

Moved, Anania sp.
Moved from ID Request.

 
Aaron,I appreciate your hel
Aaron,
I appreciate your help, but I am skeptical of coronata complex/tertialis placement (as I know I must be of quebecensis placement due to range considerations). Doing a side-by-side comparison of my image with the plates at MPG I note especially that in tertialis the white patches are more distinct, the dark shading less diffuse/even, and the pm line tends to thicken and curve and be less finely/distinctly serrate near the costa. Also tertialis has a darker outer forewing margin whereas quebecensis has an overall paler outer and costal forewing margins. My image is clearly a better visual match with quebecensis. Can we somehow give this further scrutiny? Thank you again!

 
Anania quebecensis
Your "... less finely/distinctly serrate near the costa..." comment appears to be spot on. This feature is used to separate the two species in the Munroe (1976) key.

 
Thanks, Steve. I wasn't aware
Thanks, Steve. I wasn't aware of that. Cooked it up from scratch!

 
Did not think of quebecensis
I agree with your analysis. I hadn't subscribed to the image, so sorry it took a while for me to stumble upon your comment.

 
Aaron, Thanks for your reply
Aaron,
Thanks for your reply. I figured my comment might have gotten overlooked somehow. Hopefully we can get further feedback.

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