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Photo#149236
Wrack-heap Hydrophilidae - Cercyon littoralis

Wrack-heap Hydrophilidae - Cercyon littoralis
Odiorne State Park, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA
September 22, 2007
Size: about 3 mm
Collected by sifting wrack deposits along the rocky coast at the annual all-taxa BioBlitz hosted by the Seacoast Science Center. I could have had live ones to photograph but I killed them just as our beetle expert was putting away his scope and now must shoot and post to get IDs of these dead specimens.

These beetles were in fairly old, rotting seaweed heaps. I imagined them swimming through the yucky muck just like hydrophilids in a cowpie.

If you sense something odd about this image, it likely owes to my having superimposed the front portion of each beetle from another photo taken from a somewhat different angle. I did so in order to present a better focused view.

Images of this individual: tag all
Wrack-heap Hydrophilidae - Cercyon littoralis Wrack-heap Hydrophilidae - Cercyon littoralis

Moved
Moved from Cercyon.

Moved

Cercyon sp.
In Europe, we have two spp. typical for being in this habitat, C.littorale and C.depressus. Both occur in N-America also, according to Nearctica.
The spp. are less convex than most Cercyon (applies to these), and their usual coulouring is just like here.

Discrimination: in C.littorale, the lateral edge of the protibia is notched (incised) apically; in C.depressus, it is not. I can´t see this character in your images.

 
I never checked the tibiae
but Don says this is Cercyon litoralis. I had turned in some specimens of the same species from the same source earlier in the day that he IDed.

 
Thank you, Boris.
I'll have a look, maybe this evening. I did notice immediately that these were not as convex as other Cercyon. I suppose I should add a side view to better illustrate that.

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