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Photo#151057
Parasitic wasp - Dendrocerus

Parasitic wasp - Dendrocerus
Lanoraie, Lanaudière County, Quebec, Canada
August 31, 2007
Size: 1.4 mm
It went out of an aphid. Is it possible to identify it?

Moved
Moved from Megaspilidae.

Dendrocerus sp. confirmed by Charles Godfray, University of Oxford.

Family Megaspilidae
Exceptional image! Wing venation is a match. ID can be confirmed if the fore tibia has two apical spurs (can't make it out here). There is an apparently common species, Dendrocerus carpenteri (Curtis), which is a hyperparasite of braconids that parasitize aphids.

If you have access to it, check the key in Borror & Delong's Introduction to the Study of Insects.

 
Maybe Dendrocerus
Thanks Brad for the information! I found the Introduction to the Study of Insects. Yes, it is a Megaspilidae: the wing venation is like the illustration in the book (p. 682 of 6th edition). It is probably a Dendrocerus but I am not sure enough to create a page for this gender.I have replaced the picture posted in August by a better one (17 pictures stacked with CombineZM).

Moved
Moved from Frass.

Frassed

 
Not clear to us why you frassed this
We are hoping to learn more about it when some of the wasp experts chime in. Could we possibly leave it in ID Request for a while longer?

 
Live specimen instead
I was planning to submit a picture of a living specimen, instead. But I have no objection to return this one to ID Request... just in case no wasp emerge from my aphids.
Thanks!

Lysiphlebus testaceipes, I think

 
Asaphes suspensus ????
I have searched pictures of Lysiphlebus testaceipes and I think the wing pattern is slightly different. The brown patch is not rounded. I have found a picture of Asaphes suspensus here: http://www.theses.ulaval.ca/2004/21436/ch01.html#d0e345
It seems similar to my insect, but maybe many insects look like that.
Thanks for your help, Ron.

 
Definitely not Asaphes suspensus
The picture found on this site http://www.theses.ulaval.ca/2004/21436/ch01.html#d0e345
and similar to my specimen is Dendrocerus not Asaphes.

 
You're welcome, Claude
Wish I could do more.

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