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Photo#1510838
unknown aquatic invertebrate

unknown aquatic invertebrate
Waterloo Recreation Area , Washtenaw County, Michigan, USA
April 19, 2018
This is a small aquatic invertebrate that we saw many of in a small pond that most likely has no fish, but many frogs. When it was swimming, we could see its gills constantly fanning. We thought at first it might be a damselfly nymph, but with the large gills and lack of legs (at least that we could see), we don't think that's it. We greatly appreciate anyone's ideas of a possible ID! Also, sorry for the blurriness, the insect wouldn't stop moving!

Definitely a fairy shrimp
An obligate vernal pool invertebrate (the eggs need to dry up before they'll hatch). Presumably the frogs are wood frogs...

 
Thanks!
I agree, thank you so much for the ID! In looking further it seems the most common Michigan genus is Eubranchipus, which it may be, though I'll need to collect some in a container to check it out more closely.

Fairy Shrimp?


Hold on to see what others think.

Welcome to BugGuide!

 
Thanks!
I agree, thank you so much for the ID! In looking further it seems the most common Michigan genus is Eubranchipus, which it may be, though I'll need to collect some in a container to check it out more closely.

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