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Photo#1511190
Hemerobius - Hemerobius humulinus - female

Hemerobius - Hemerobius humulinus - Female
Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, USA
April 14, 2018
Size: 10-11mm head to wingtips
I think this is Hemerobius humulinus but the guide says there are 14 species in North America and the only key I can find is for Florida which has only 2 species.

The broad stripe on the thorax should rule out H.stigma and probably H. conjunctus. That leaves 11 species unaccounted for. The Species catalog of the Neuroptera, Megaloptera, and Raphidioptera of America North of Mexico (1) lists ranges for all 14 species with an additional 3 having some records from the eastern US (costalis, pinidumus, and simulans). Other than photos of yellowed pinned specimens, I can’t find any info on those 3 species and would appreciate some help. TIA

Update 1/29/19: I think that costalis and simulans are ruled out on the basis of wing venation using the photos in plate 1 of Carpenter's paper (2). Still no luck with pinidumus which Carpenter treats as belonging within conjunctus

Images of this individual: tag all
Hemerobius - Hemerobius humulinus - female Hemerobius - Hemerobius humulinus - female Hemerobius - Hemerobius humulinus - female Hemerobius - Hemerobius humulinus - female

Moved
Moved from Hemerobius.

Moved
Moved from Brown Lacewings.

Dr. Oswald kindly responded to my request for help with this one. He said "Definitely Hemerobius, most probably humulinus. Specimen is a female. Truly definitive species IDs generally require dissection of males. But, this is almost certainly humulinus."

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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