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Photo#1516589
Bucculatrix quadrigemina on a Mantis

Bucculatrix quadrigemina on a Mantis
San Marcos, San Diego County, California, USA
October 24, 2017
Bucculatrix quadrigemina I believe, riding on the forearm of a Mantis hunting at the UV light setup in my backyard last fall. Identified from photos on MPG and here on BugGuide, although this specimen is missing the upright black wing scales mentioned in MOWNA.

Moved

Lithocolletinae
Looks like maybe a Cremastobombycia. Definitely not this species, but somewhat similar:

Might also be a Cameraria.

 
Thanks.
Thanks for the tip! I had “photo matched” at the MPG website and had filtered the search with a CA location so the species you have led me to had not shown up. Frequently look thru Mark Dreilling’s website on San Diego moths (it’s been been very useful for local species) and the BugGuide species pages when I get down to a few candidates. The MOWNA book is handy but such small photos are difficult to use for fine details.

I’ll take some more time and look thru the species you mentioned.

Thanks again.

Greg Smith

 
Unfortunately...
there are many undescribed gracillariids in California, so it's entirely possible that you won't find a match. Also a good number of the described species have not been photographed.

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