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Photo#152028
Stick Insect - Diapheromera velii - female

Stick Insect - Diapheromera velii - Female
Bartlesville, Washington County, Oklahoma, USA
October 14, 2007
Size: 4 inches
This stick insect was found crossing a gravel county road in a rural part of eastern Washington County. I've looked through Bugguide and also Chad Arment's Stick Insects of the Continental United States and Canada and can't figure this one out.

The body is almost 4 inches long. It is around 6 inches with the antennae factored in.

Images of this individual: tag all
Stick Insect - Diapheromera velii - female Stick Insect - Diapheromera velii - female Stick Insect - Diapheromera velii - female Stick Insect - Diapheromera velii Stick Insect - Diapheromera velii

Moved
Moved from Diapheromera.

Hi Aaron, if you're still looking in,
this would be almost certainly Diapheromera velii, if it was in a prairie area or similar (to me this is what it looks more like). If in a wooded area, it is probably D. femorata. Those are the only two likely candidates, and the females are indeed difficult to tell apart, especially from photos alone. I honestly don't know if the eggs look different, but probably they are very similar.

From the photos alone, it doesn't look to me like Manomera blatchleyi, but that species and D. velii are very similar. M. blatchleyi has a longer head and no spine under the middle femora. The head looks too short in these photos (but it's hard to be certain), and you can't see the underside of the femora.

Female.
This specimen is a female, and females are always much more difficult to ID. I would say it is probably a species of Diapheromera, but there may be more than one species in Oklahoma....

Sorry,
can't help with ID. I do have a question though. Can these critters bite/sting in any way?

Gary

 
Harmless
Nope, they're perfectly harmless. There are some species - namely in the Anisomorpha genus - that can spray/exude a noxious liquid, and that's a predator deterrent.

 
Thanks Aaron
Just a good thing to know in case I ever see one as I'd have to handle it being the big kid I am. 8-)

Gary

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