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Photo#1523301
Male, Oecanthus? - Oecanthus - male

Male, Oecanthus? - Oecanthus - Male
Nogales, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
May 21, 2018
Size: 22 mm
Caught sweeping vegetation
Coordinates: 31.336744, -110.967443

Images of this individual: tag all
Male, Oecanthus? - Oecanthus - male Male, Oecanthus? - Oecanthus - male Male, Oecanthus? - Oecanthus - male Male, Oecanthus? - Oecanthus - male Male, Oecanthus? - Oecanthus - male Male, Oecanthus? - Oecanthus - male

Definitely in the rileyi group....
...based on the round dots on the first 2 antennal segments.

The size of the dots matches best for O. fultoni. However, the coloring doesn't match. The abdomen should be white. Perhaps this is an expired male who was photographed days after it expired?

 
I suspected O. fultoni, but
several features didn't match the images posted on BugGuide. This was a fresh specimen that I froze for immediate focus-stacking under a microscope. Usually, this process doesn't change insect colors and I didn't notice any change here either. The coloration of his abdomen may have changed, I simply didn't see it. The only time I observed a change in the color of a subject, using this method, was when I posted live and focus-stacked photographs of Scolopendra heros. The bright red colors turned into bluish green:

An interesting discovery for me was observing a wide fold along the wing costal margin. I straightened the forewing placing a glass microscope slide on top, but it was hard to contrast the light green wing with the white background; which appeared gray. I had to cut off the background, but the resulting image gives the impression of a grey wing; which was not the case.

 
Watch for more
If you are in the same area, watch for more. If you find others that look like O. fultoni/O. rileyi with dark on the belly....it would be interesting.

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