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Photo#152453
Tibicen figurata - Neotibicen davisi

Tibicen figurata - Neotibicen davisi
Naples, Collier County, Florida, USA
October 17, 2007
Size: Body 3cm, incl. wings 4cm
I believe this is either Tibicen lyricen, or lyrical cicada. I also wonder if this larvae or grub exiting is a parasite or the cicada. I thought it was dead just hanging on our screen enclosure. When I removed it and started taking more pictures its legs wiggled and out crawled this larvae. It moved very fast, head down until reaching a potted plant I placed under the table edge. It quickly buried it's self. Within two hours the cicada was dry, brown, crunchy.

Images of this individual: tag all
failed pupation ID Please - Neotibicen davisi Tibicen figurata - Neotibicen davisi Tibicen figurata - Neotibicen davisi Tibicen figurata - Neotibicen davisi

Moved

Moved
Moved from Tibicen figuratus.

Tibicen davisi
3 cm = slightly more than 1 inch
To qualify as a T. figuratus, I'd be more satisfied with > 6 cm.

Additionally, the green pigments are not typical of T. figuratus (teneral or sclerotized).

All of the above, coupled with the seemingly disproportiantely larger head, leads me to believe this to be a T. davisi.

Tibicen davisi
3 cm = slightly more than 1 inch
To qualify as a T. figuratus, I'd be more satisfied with > 6 cm.

Additionally, the green pigments are not typical of T. figuratus (teneral or sclerotized).

All of the above, coupled with the seemingly disproportiantely larger head, leads me to believe this to be a T. davisi.

Moved
Moved from Tibicen figurata.

Can you rear the larva?
It must surely have pupated. Dig it up, photograph it, and put it in a sealed jar with a little moist dirt and check daily. It would be interesting to see what it looks like in adult form.

 
Adult form of the pupaited larvae.
Well I didn't have much luck. Maybe I didn't keep it moist enough. I will add one more picture. I guess we'll never know for sure.

 
Thank you all
Thank you all for your help. I have dug it up and will take some photos. I've never done this before so pardon my questions. Other than some dirt, is there anything else I should also include in the jar? I will follow it up here and include the photos. Thank you again.

 
No,
the dirt is just to keep it from drying out.

how strange!
it must be some kind of parasite that is eating the cicada...

 
Agreed.
My bets would be on a tachinid fly, or a Sandalus beetle, in that order. The behavior of the emerging larva suggests a fly maggot, but I don't know the life cycle of Sandalus.

 
Thank you
Thank you for your help. I'll update when I know have more info.

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