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Photo#1537381
Cicadellid ID request - Jikradia olitoria

Cicadellid ID request - Jikradia olitoria
Sun City Center Nature Trails, Hillsborough County, Florida, USA
June 14, 2018
Size: ~ 9 mm
In oak hammock

Images of this individual: tag all
Cicadellid ID request - Jikradia olitoria Cicadellid ID request - Jikradia olitoria

Moved
Moved from Leafhoppers.

 
Thanks Kyle, and...
...I appreciated learning this from your entry on the info page:
This species is somewhat of a slight taxonomic nightmare. The status of the subspecies and various synonyms under J. olitoria has fluctuated greatly over the past several decades. Recently Nielson et al. (2014) reinstated floridana as a distinct species separate from olitoria, but it is not clear why this is the case and what characteristics he used to separate the two species. C. Dietrich notes that males and females differ in coloration in the genus and there seems to be a great deal of variation in color pattern within one sex. Nielson (1979) showed that all the different color forms, originally thought to represent different species, instead were all the same species with the same male genitalia. Therefore, it seems that until a proper revision of the genus is published, everything should be placed under J. olitoria, and we can for now refer to J. olitoria as a species with a great deal of variation in both color and pattern (and therefore it is not worth trying to separate to subspecies due to the variation). [Kyle Kittelberger]

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