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Photo#1538594
Pollen wasp - Pseudomasaris? - Pseudomasaris edwardsii

Pollen wasp - Pseudomasaris? - Pseudomasaris edwardsii
Lewiston Fish and Game Office, Nez Perce County, Idaho, USA
June 14, 2018

Moved
Moved from Pseudomasaris.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Pseudomasaris wasp
Ken, this looks like Pseudomasaris edwardsii. This species forages on Phacelia which is fairly common in Lewiston/Nez Perce county area.

 
How confident are you?
I agree that it looks like edwardsii, but I don't know these critters well enough to make the call--especially since P. zonalis also feeds on Phacelia.

 
Pseudomasaris edwardsii
Hi Ken,
I am pretty confident. On Bugguide the emphasis is on the tibial bump but I see that in the photos on some P. zonalis females too. But for P edwardsia that large yellow dorsal tooth and yellow marking pattern of the propodeum appears to me a more consistent diagnostic - also the two yellow marks on the thorax which as far as I have seen does not appear on P zonalis. I checked my photos against the pinned P edwardsii and P zonalis in the insect collection at Oregon State University. Based on their collection, your wasp fits P edwardsii better than p zonalis.

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