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Photo#155082
leaf footed bug nymph - Leptoglossus

leaf footed bug nymph - Leptoglossus
Sevier County, Tennessee, USA
November 2, 2007
This is quite a bit smaller than the other leaf footed bugs I have photographed (Leptoglossus phyllopus)Is this a different species? or juvenile Leptoglossus phyllopus? I noticed this one has bumpy ridges on its back and it was very camera shy whereas the other leaf footed bugs don't seem to mind my presence.

Images of this individual: tag all
leaf footed bug nymph - Leptoglossus leaf footed bug nymph - Leptoglossus

Moved

Moved
Moved from Frass. I think there is enough detail here that it may be identified in future. I also disagree with frassing that has no editorial explanation.

Frassed

Moved
Moved from Leaffooted Bugs.

Cropping
Please, remember that only you and the editors can see the large version with all its details. If you crop this image (eliminating most of the background) to about 560 pixels on the larger side, everybody can see them.
In fact, probably one cropped image would be more informative than three uncropped one.

If those broad shoulders are not just due to the angle
L. fulvicornis seems like a strong possibility. It would be nice to get documentation of some other spp. - phyllopus nymphs are the only ones we have well covered. Any chance you can go back and find it again as it matures?

Nymph.
It IS a nymph, but I don't know which species, as there should be several in your area.

 
Nymph
Thank you for confirming that this is a nymph. I figured it must be as it was so small.

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