Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1575720
Curated specimen of female P. brachyrhynchus from the CAS - Physoconops brachyrhynchus - female

Curated specimen of female P. brachyrhynchus from the CAS - Physoconops brachyrhynchus - Female
Ozark Lake, (county unspecified in label info) County, Missouri, USA
September 22, 1939
A distinctive character for females of P. brachyrhynchus is their relatively small theca, compared to many other members of the genus (especially in subgenus Pachyconops). The theca is the thumb-like appendage projecting below the 5th sternite, and in P. brachyrhynchus typically its length is appreciably less than the height of the 5th segment. In fact, in the specimen here the theca is actually fairly-large for this species. For instance, compare with the line drawing in Figure 2 here, and the BOLD specimens below:

    BOLD web site Physoconops branchyrhyncus image   BOLD web site Physoconops branchyrhyncus image

The theca is "opposed" by the downward extension of the somewhat plate-like 7th sternite. Together they are used to pry open the inter-tergital membrane of the hymenopterous hosts to insert an egg...either in flight, or while the host is at a flower. Thus the theca is not really a reproductive organ...its use is apparently for oviposition only.

Other diagnostic characters for P. brachyrhynchus include the entirely pale (yellowish) cheek; and the uniform-width pleural stripe that runs the entire length of the side of the thorax (between the green arrows in the photo). The pleural stripe is more easily discerned (i.e. with less flash-glare) in the 1st image of this series.

The abdominal segments are numbered in green in the photo.

Images of this individual: tag all
Curated specimen of female P. brachyrhynchus from the CAS - Physoconops brachyrhynchus - female Curated specimen of female P. brachyrhynchus from the CAS - Physoconops brachyrhynchus - female