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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Species Lasius brevicornis - formerly Lasius flavus

Lemon ant - Lasius brevicornis little orange ants with springtails - Lasius brevicornis little orange ants with springtails - Lasius brevicornis Lasius flavus - Lasius brevicornis - female Lasius flavus - Lasius brevicornis - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon (Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps)
Superfamily Formicoidea (Ants)
Family Formicidae (Ants)
Subfamily Formicinae
Tribe Lasiini
Genus Lasius (cornfield ants, citronella ants)
No Taxon (Subgenus Cautolasius)
Species brevicornis (formerly Lasius flavus)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Lasius flavus has long been applied to the Nearctic population. Schar, et al 2018 (see print references) at long last elevated this species out of the Eurasian taxon L. flavus.
Explanation of Names
Author: Carlo Emery, 1893
Range
Holarctic; common throughout e. US south to the mountains of NC-TN; rare in the Gulf States
Habitat
Subterranean ant; nests most often under stones
Remarks
At the beginning of the colony there are several queens which groom each other and prevent fungal infections that might kill solitary queens. But when the first workers eclose and start foraging, the extra queens are eliminated; mature colonies generally have a single queen.
Print References
Schar, et al. (2018) Do Holarctic ant species exist? Trans-Beringian dispersal and homoplasy in the Formicidae. Journal of Biogeography. 2018;1–12.
Internet References