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Photo#1588433
Chrysomelobia labidomerae? - Chrysomelobia labidomerae

Chrysomelobia labidomerae? - Chrysomelobia labidomerae
Beech Bluff, Madison County, Tennessee, USA
September 1, 2018
This Labidomera clivicollis was continuously raising and lowering its elytra so I took a couple of shots. At the time I didn't notice the mites so I didn't get any better shots of them.

Images of this individual: tag all
Chrysomelobia labidomerae? - Chrysomelobia labidomerae Chrysomelobia labidomerae? - Chrysomelobia labidomerae

Moved
Moved from Mites and Ticks. This species was the subject of my undergraduate research last semester. I’ll fill out the species page shortly.

Chrysomelobia labidomerae (Prostigmata: Podapolipidae)
Those are great images! I sent a link to these photos to Owen Seeman at the Queensland Museum, who has done a lot of work on podapolipids of chrysomelids. Here's what he said:

"Has to be Chrysomelobia labidomerae - you can see a nice pile of eggs in the whitish cement that the female makes to stick them to the host. I can see just one female for sure in the colony (to the left, she's dark-orange with a white uric acid stripe) and presumably another female on the other side but without eggs.

According to Baker & Eickwort (1975), the females lay their eggs on the wings, then the larvae move down to the base of the wings and dorsal thorax, and then to the dorsal abdomen.

In the Australian Chrysomelobia, they tended to use the wings only when the anterior elytral cavity, dorsal thorax and anterior dorsal abdomen was occupied, i.e., a big infection!"

 
Thanks for the extra effort!
Thanks for the extra effort! I can't find a page for Chrysomelobia labidomerae on BG so now I need to figure out who to ask to get one added.

 
Er... That would be you :)
As an editor, you have the power!

 
I don't think there are any o
I don't think there are any other images of the family Podapolipidae, so you might need to ask for several new pages!

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