Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 BugGuide Gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Species Phaloesia saucia - Saucy Beauty - Hodges#8039

Caterpillar - Phaloesia saucia Saucy Beauty - Phaloesia saucia unknown moth - Phaloesia saucia unknown moth - Phaloesia saucia unknown moth - Phaloesia saucia Phaloesia saucia Walker - Phaloesia saucia Unknown MothFW_3615 - Phaloesia saucia Phaloesia saucia adult - Phaloesia saucia
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Noctuoidea (Owlet Moths and kin)
Family Erebidae
Subfamily Arctiinae (Tiger and Lichen Moths)
Tribe Arctiini (Tiger Moths)
Subtribe Pericopina
Genus Phaloesia
Species saucia (Saucy Beauty - Hodges#8039)
Hodges Number
8039
Explanation of Names
Phaloesia saucia Walker, 1854
saucia (L). "wounded," may refer to the tiny red wing spots.
Numbers
1 sp. n. of Mex.
Identification
Range
Three southmost counties of Texas / south to Venezuela
Season
Feb-Dec (MPG)
Food
Larvae host on soldierbush - Tournefortia (Family Boraginaceae)
Host in Texas is Bastard Rat-root, T. volubilis.
Adults use a variety of nectar sources including Crucita, Eupatorium odoratum; Whitebrush, Aloysia gratissima; and Texas Sabal Palm, Sabal texana.
Print References
Kendall, R.O. 1970. A day-flying moth (Pericopidae) new to Texas and the United States. Journal of The Lepidopterists' Society, 24(4): 301-303. (Full PDF)
Knudson, E.C., and C. Bordelon 2004. Illustrated Checklist of the Lepidoptera of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, TX, Vol. 2B: Macro-Moths. Texas Lepidoptera Survey. (1)
Internet References
Saucy Beauty - Mike Quinn, 2007
Works Cited
1.Illustrated Checklist of the Lepidoptera of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, Vol. 2B: Macro-Moths
Ed Knudson & Charles Bordelon. 2004. Texas Lepidoptera Survey, Houston. xiv + 59 pp. 20 plates.