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Photo#1597837
Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 1

Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 1
Carrboro, Orange County, North Carolina, USA
September 30, 2018
These are the first leaf mines I've ever found on Camellias (I am pretty sure that's what the plant is). I am also pretty sure these are Agromyzids. They remind me of Phytomyza opacae, although I know that's not what this is.

Images of this individual: tag all
Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 1 Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 2 Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 8 Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 12 Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 3 Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 4 Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 6 Carrboro leaf miner on Camelia maybe D1205 Agromyzid 2018 14

Moved

The only known Camellia leafminer...
is Tropicomyia theae. No species of Tropicomyia are known to occur in North America, but apparently they do form silvery epidermal mines like this (otherwise Phytomyza opacae and Liriomyza schmidti are the only agromyzids I know of that do so). I'm not sure if they form puparia on the lower surface as shown in your photos. I hope you can follow up on this one; a new fly genus for the continent would be a significant find, and if it's T. theae it could turn up on all sorts of other plants since that is a polyphagous species.

 
I will try to confirm the pla
I will try to confirm the plant species to be sure. If it is a Camellia, I have searched those plants many times over the last several years and have never found anything until today. Thus, I will try to follow up, yet I am not sure how reliably I'll be able to find these. Today I found only two. Do the puparia look old to you? I imagine they must be old/empty.

 
They do look old,
but maybe I can interest Sonja Scheffer in barcoding them.

 
I'll include those leaves in
I'll include those leaves in the next package I send (with very few things, but a few).

 
Great
I did some digging and can confirm that Tropicomyia theae forms a brown puparium within the mine. No accounts I've found mention that it's on the lower surface, but illustrations of the mine don't show the puparium, suggesting that it may be.

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