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Photo#1600858
Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male

Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - Male
Pinon Flat, Riverside County, California, USA
May 24, 1939
The pattern of the dark facial markings for P. townsendi in frontal view is illustrated in Fig. 5, Pl. 1 from Curran(1924). That figure shows a (very slightly bulging) medial band that extends from the base of the antennae to the oral margin...together with two very thin, somewhat inwardly-arching, lateral lines that extend downward from the transverse line at the antennifer to about 3/4 the distance to the oral margin.

The specimen photo at the top of this page is similar in form...but with the "lateral lines" significantly thicker and bolder...the entire pattern resembling a downward-pointing trident (or stylized "T").

Apparently there is considerable variation in the thickness/boldness of the "lateral lines" in P. townsendi...from a thickened trident as above, to one with narrower "lateral lines" (as in the 1st thumbnail below, and in Curran's Fig. 5), to virtually no "lateral lines" (as in the 2nd thumbnail below):

         

Also the color can vary from reddish-brown to black, and the medial band from solidly dark to pale (yellowish) within.

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Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male Curated male Polybiomyia from the Essig Museum - Polybiomyia townsendi - male