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Photo#160500
Eupeodes or Syrphus or ?? - Eupeodes volucris - female

Eupeodes or Syrphus or ?? - Eupeodes volucris - Female
Aromas, San Benito County, California, USA
December 10, 2007
Size: ~11mm
Saw this guy today on Euryops, I think it is a Syrphini, maybe Eupeodes or Syrphus or ??. (live oak/chaparral habitat).

Images of this individual: tag all
Eupeodes or Syrphus or ?? - Eupeodes volucris - female Eupeodes or Syrphus or ?? - Eupeodes volucris - female

Moved
Moved from Eupeodes.

Moved
Moved from Scaeva pyrastri.

Not Scaeva
As pointed out in the other picture of this tread, this is not Scaeva. The forehead is different, as are the spots.
In Scaeva pyrastri the spots have a different shape and also the position on the thorax is differnt.
So, this should be a female Eupeodes sp.! Could be the female of Eupeodes volucris, but that is an educated guess!
greetings

 
Spots - I think I'm starting to see them properly.
I think we have several Eupeodes and Scaeva mislabeled, and some of that may be my fault. No more IDs on these from me unless I'm certain. Thanks, Gerard, for the clarification.

Scaeva pyrastri, but they all do look a lot alike.
Note differences in antenna (this is more pronounced), color of stripes (whiter here), and gaps in stripes.

 
Thanks Ron
for the ID of this species, seems like there are a fair number of similar species that occur in our yard, but now maybe I'll be able to recognize this species next time I see it, using the characters you listed.

 
You're welcome, Gary. We have a lot of insects in common.
I'm looking forward to what your other post on this topic brings forth, as I've asked and obtained widely different answers.

BTW, our Natural History of Orange County website might be a decent resource for you, particularly with syrphids:
http://nathistoc.bio.uci.edu/diptera/index.htm#Brachycera

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