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Photo#161871
Pristocera armifera - Pristepyris armiferus - male

Pristocera armifera - Pristepyris armiferus - Male
Marlton, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA
October 3, 2007
Size: Maybe around 9 mm?
At one time I think I had an idea what this is (or close anyway). Either I was wrong, I forgot, or an entire section of the guide has disappeared! Now all I can say is "Wasp"? If I thought it was female I could rule out things with ovipositors, but I'm not sure of anything other than 1) Big dimpled head 2) Wasp waisted

Images of this individual: tag all
Pristocera armifera - Pristepyris armiferus - male Pristocera armifera - Pristepyris armiferus - male Pristocera armifera - Pristepyris armiferus - male

Moved
Moved from Bethylidae.

Moved
Moved from Tiphiid Wasps.

Yes.
This looks to be a 'tiphiioid' thing, probably a male. My first guess would be family Tiphiidae, but I'm not even 100% positive of 'that!' Nice images should ensure evenutal positive ID.

 
My impression is the same, ma
My impression is the same, male Tiphiidae. The rugose punctation on the head and the complex wing venation point in that direction.

 
Thanks guys
Thank you both, I'll move over there and see if anything comes of it.

 
I'm pretty sure this one is in fact....
a Bethylid male (Bethylidae, subfamily Mesitiinae). This subfamily contains exceptionnally large Bethylids, with heavily punctuated head and often a metallic hue, just like this one wasp. What can be seen of forewing venation seems to me not to be "complex" enough for a Tiphiid, while arched "radial" or marginal" vein matches very well with typical Bethylid venation. So does shape of bottleneck-like pronotum and short mesoscutum, with both straight "notauli".

 
New image added
I have done horrible unspeakable things in photoshop to try and bring out more wing detail. I thought it might help?

 
I can see why I would have mi
I can see why I would have missed that. Evans (Bethylidae of America north of Mexico) doesn't list any members of the Mesitiinae being present in our region. We supposedly only had the other three subfamilies present.

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