Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#162149
Tibicen dealbatus - Megatibicen dealbatus - female

Tibicen dealbatus - Megatibicen dealbatus - Female
Socorro, Socorro County, New Mexico, USA
July 31, 2005
This cicada was found outside the Motel 6 at night. Several had flown to the outdoor building lights.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tibicen dealbatus - Megatibicen dealbatus - female Tibicen dorsata - Megatibicen dealbatus - female Tibicen dorsata - Megatibicen dealbatus - female

Moved
Moved from Tibicen dorsata.

 
a few comments
This species is usually green or at least greenish in most areas where it is found (while it is alive anyway), and the color is usually enough to separate it from T. dorsata. However, in the Rio Grand drainage in New Mexico, it is brown, and looks a lot like T. dorsata. The dark markings are not as strongly developed, and as Andy mentioned the head is wider. Also, the brown is not the rich orangey brown that is typical of T. dorsata. This species occurs primarily in trees along watercourses or in towns, while T. dorsata favors shrubs out in open country (though I have found the two together where habitat meets, and even what I think might be a few hybrids once). I have been here in New Mexico since 1982, and have never found T. dorsata along the Rio Grande - so far anyway.

Tibicen dealbatus
This species has a wider head than T. dorsata. The specimen is a female.

 
Darn!
I thought I was slick enough to ID this one correctly. I knew if anyone could clear this up it would be you, Andy. Thanks for the correction.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.