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Photo#1622068
Orange-brown tephritoid-like fly with unmarked wings, blackish abdomen, and brown & white legs - Afrocamilla bispinosa

Orange-brown tephritoid-like fly with unmarked wings, blackish abdomen, and brown & white legs - Afrocamilla bispinosa
Santa Ana Mountains, Orange County, California, USA
March 30, 2018
Piophilidae ?

Images of this individual: tag all
Orange-brown tephritoid-like fly with unmarked wings, blackish abdomen, and brown & white legs - Afrocamilla bispinosa Orange-brown tephritoid-like fly with unmarked wings, blackish abdomen, and brown & white legs - Afrocamilla bispinosa Orange-brown tephritoid-like fly with unmarked wings, blackish abdomen, and brown & white legs - Afrocamilla bispinosa

Moved
Moved from "Acalyptratae".

Moved
Moved from Flies.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Not Piophilidae
Head and wing are like Drosophilidae but I can't place it into a genus, and the lack of small hairs on the scutum is unusual for that family.

 
Thanks for your valuable input, John !
I wasn't suspecting Drosophilidae based on habitus/gestalt.
I tried to key it out in Drosophilidae and ended up with the following four genera and one subgenus, in decreasing order of matching with the McAlpin key ONLY:
Drosophilinae:Scaptomyza
Drosophilinae:Cladochaeta [does not match the key nicely]
Drosophilinae:Chymomyza [does not match the key nicely]
Drosophilinae:Drosophila (Scaptodrosophila) [does not match the key nicely]
Steganinae:Trachyleucophenga [does not match the key well at all]

When including other information (i.e. beyond the key) the first four taxa, which all belong to subfamily Drosophilinae, do not appear to match ...
There is not much info on Trachyleucophenga to match to ...
In summary, I agree that none of the (described) Drosophilidae genera appears to match ...
Could it belong in another family ?

 
Camillidae
Hi John, John & Emile,

I signed up to BugGuide especially to comment on these photo's!
The direction of Drosophilidae is correct, it is in the same Superfamily: Ephydroidea. The typical speherical scutum with large dorsocentrals, and strong setae antro-ventrally on anterior femur are typical of Camillidae. In the Nearctic there are 4 species known, two Camilla and two Afrocamilla, the former have green thorax and the latter orange. Based on what I can see this should be Afrocamilla bispinosa, described from San Dimos Canyon, Los Angeles, about sixty miles North of where these photo's were taken. As far as I know, no other records beside the single female type exist. The paper describing the species can be found here: https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/16152963#page/755/mode/1up

Kind regards,
Ectemnius

 
Already on BugGuide
I already identified one from the Channel Islands but didn't recognize this one.

Now two of the three known records are from BugGuide.

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