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Photo#1625648
spider wasp - Episyron - male

spider wasp - Episyron - Male
Ludwig Prairie Preserve, Winneshiek County, Iowa, USA
June 28, 2018
Size: 14 mm
This spider wasp has some white markings on its body that seem to be a characteristic of the genus Episyron. I noted in reading that several Episyron species are polytypic and positive identification to species may not be possible. Given that problem, maybe there is enough detail here to determine the species. Found in a dry prairie habitat.

Images of this individual: tag all
spider wasp - Episyron - male spider wasp - Episyron - male spider wasp - Episyron - male spider wasp - Episyron - male spider wasp - Episyron - male

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Episyron
Thanks for moving this wasp to the Episyron genus, Bob!

Male
11 flagellomeres = ♂
Thick flagellum = ♂
No tarsal-rake spines on forelegs = ♂
Fully developed wings = Adult
His tibial spines are white colored. This suggests that this might be a male Episyron conterminus posterus, but I'm not sure.

 
Episyron male
Thanks for taking a look at and adding your input to this spider wasp ID, Bob! I did notice that his tibial spines were pale too, but I'm not up to telling what clues might differentiate one species from another. If this is E. conterminus posterus, that would expand its northern range in the Midwest on BugGuide.

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