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Photo#162753
Tenebrionid 3 - Opatroides punctulatus

Tenebrionid 3 - Opatroides punctulatus
Bannister Park, Sacramento County, California, USA
December 27, 2007
Size: 10mm
Another compact Tenebrionid, not sure what

Images of this individual: tag all
Tenebrionid 3 - Opatroides punctulatus Tenebrionid 3 - Opatroides punctulatus Tenebrionid 3 - Opatroides punctulatus Tenebrionid 3 - Opatroides punctulatus

ok cool
This is Opatroides punctulatus. A species that would key out near Blapstinus. Why isn't it in the key? well thats because we didn't know it occured in the US till earlier in December. I collected a bunch with a Teneb expert and was struggling to key it out as a species of Blapstinus. While like Blapstinus, it has the completely divided eye, this species is way smoother than any other species in the area and the abruptly ending epipleura distinguished it. In my collecting trip along the Sacramento, this was by far the most common Teneb I got. It is widespread in the old world.

 
cool!
How do you think it got here? Are there other representatives of the genus in NA?

 
not sure, no
not sure how it got here. We found them near a deep water channel so could be have hitched a ride in on boats like the Eastern beach Teneb, Trachyscelis aphodiodes. Could have hitched a ride via trade of plant material. In the US, its the only species of Opatroides.

other shots
A shot of the head from above and side would be great, also an underside shot showing the epipleura (the margin of the elytra that hugs the side of the insect's body). Looks like something I collected just a week ago in Sacramento, but need these shots to be absolutely sure.

 
Unfortunately I can't stabili
Unfortunately I can't stabilize the specimen with my temporary setup to get the side or ventral shots, but I'll try and get a view of the head. Thanks so much for the quick ID work, I was hoping you'd be able to ID some of these!!

 
For this one
Check to see if eyes are completely divided (which I can sort of make out) and if the epipleura ends abruptly before the apex of the elytra. If so, it is Opatroides punctulatus, if not, it the epipleura continues to the apex of the elytra, it is Blapstinus.

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