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Discussion of 2018 gathering

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinks
Books
Data

Species Sphodros atlanticus - Atlantic purseweb spider

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Spiders of the Chiricahua Mountain area, Cochise Co., Arizona
By Albert Jung & Vincent Roth
Journal of the Arizona Academy of Science 9(1):29-34, 1974
One way to read it online is through JSTOR (you have to register for a free account and then put the paper on your book shelf) - http://www.jstor.org/stable/40021934. However, if you want a downloadable PDF, you have to purchase it (or ask around for a copy).

A synonymic index-catalogue of spiders of North, Central and South America with all adjacent islands, Greenland, Bermuda, etc
By Alexander Petrunkevitch
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 29:1-791, 1911

Further notes on American spiders
By Willis Gertsch
American Museum Novitates 726:1-26, 1934

Spiders of the Georgia region of North America
By Ralph Chamberlin & Wilton Ivie
Bulletin of the University of Utah 35(9):1-267, 1944

Common Spiders of North America
By Richard A. Bradley
University of California Press , 2012
"Spiders are among the most diverse groups of terrestrial invertebrates, yet they are among the least studied and poorly understood groups. This beautifully illustrated volume is the first comprehensive guide to all 68 families of spiders in North America and illustrates 469 of the most commonly encountered species. Species descriptions include identification tips, typical habitat, geographic distribution, and behavioral notes. A concise illustrated introduction to spider biology and anatomy provides the key for understanding spider relationships. This book is a critical resource for curious naturalists who want to understand this ubiquitous and ecologically critical component of our biosphere."

Notes on little known New England spiders
By B. J. Kaston
The Canadian Entomologist 70: 12-17, 1938
If you have a subscription, a free PDF is available from the publisher. Otherwise, I think all articles are pay-per-view only.
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8578026&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0008347X00097649

Descriptions of new spiders
By Nathan Banks
The Canadian Entomologist 29: 193-197, 1897
Available online to subscribers of The Canadian Entomologist, otherwise pay-per-view only - http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8567406&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0008347X00069029

Report on a collection of spiders from Mexico. 3.
By Willis J. Gertsch & L. Irby Davis
American Museum Novitates 1069: 1-22, 1940

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