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Photo#162854
Unkonwn Robber Fly - Stenonpogininae? - Cyrtopogon willistoni

Unkonwn Robber Fly - Stenonpogininae? - Cyrtopogon willistoni
11 mi. N. of Madras, Jefferson County, Oregon, USA
June 2, 2003
Size: 13 mm
So many species and so many similarities between some of these robbers. ID help for this western fly would be most appreciated.

Images of this individual: tag all
Unkonwn Robber Fly - Stenonpogininae? - Cyrtopogon willistoni Unkonwn Robber Fly - Stenonpogininae? - Cyrtopogon willistoni Unkonwn Robber Fly - Stenonpogininae? - Cyrtopogon willistoni Unkonwn Robber Fly - Stenonpogininae? - Cyrtopogon willistoni Unkonwn Robber Fly - Stenonpogininae? - Cyrtopogon willistoni

Moved
Moved from Stenopogoninae.

Moving
Moving to subafamily until an ID is confirmed, beautiful series!

Northeastern fauna
Is very different from our eastern group. The Cyrtopogon genus is just huge. You have about thirty species up there and this fly has the wings of that genus and the very convex central face. (Side facial view always helpful in this group and an antenna shot.) They are also very hairy. Dr. Cannings might have a chance of getting the species. But I have seen one museum specimen of a Cyrt. And the key (which reminds me to go find one) is not owned by me. You have the correct subfamily.

 
Adittional photos
Hershcel, thanks for narrowing down the field of robbers here. I am glad to have the correct genus. I have added some photos that might help in identification of this insect. Your knowledge of Asilidae is invaluable to so many who use this site. Thanks a million.

 
Dr. Cannings
Fairly easily stated it was Cyrtopogon willistoni. And commented:

"Quite common in late spring
in southern BC grasslands, especially mesic ones with plenty of forbs.
It ranges south through most of the western US mountains. Pretty tarsal
ornamentation on the front two legs."

 
Great
Thank you for getting this identified for me and the guide. It is nice to have a firm ID along with a few side comments. Blessings on your efforts.

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