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Photo#163086
Periodic cicada in Western New Mexico? - Hadoa duryi

Periodic cicada in Western New Mexico? - Hadoa duryi
Datil, Catron County, New Mexico, USA
June 15, 2007
Size: 1.5 inches
I know this is a cicada, but I'm not sure which species. These emerged by the millions mid-June, 2007 in the mountains of western New Mexico where I've lived for two years. I did not see them the previous summer. They had a preference for the Pinon Pines but covered the house, power poles and just about everything else. The locals say that these emerge once every 3 years, some said 5 years. From what I read, periodic cicadas exist east of the Mississippi, but these were obviously west. Another smaller, dull brownish-gray cicada emerged at the same time. It prefered the Junipers and made a clicking sound.

Images of this individual: tag all
Periodic cicada in Western New Mexico? - Hadoa duryi Periodic cicada in Western New Mexico? - Hadoa duryi Periodic cicada in Western New Mexico? - Hadoa duryi

Tibicen druryi
The red underside and red spots on the pronotum are distinctive.

There are several species that are "proto-periodic", appearing in numbers some years, but not (or rarely) in others. These insects usually have broods separated by only about 3-5 years, but the life cycle is probably at least twice as long.

No.
Not the genus Magicicada. Not sure 'what' these are, but we do have a 'new' cicada expert here who might be able to at least give a genus:-) Stay tuned.

 
I added a few more images whi
I added a few more images which may help.

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