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The ants of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. (Part I.).
By Wheeler, W.M.
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 24(21): 399-485., 1908
Cite: 1639325 with citation markup [cite:1639325]
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Wheeler, W.M. 1908. The ants of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. (Part I.), Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 24(21): 399-485.

Although the ant-fauna of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona comprises a greater number of species than that of the whole remaining portion of America north of Mexico, it has never been made the subject of systematic investigation. In the following study I have brought together the scattered and rather meager materials published by previous authors and have added several new forms, especially of Pheidole, a cosmopolitan genus represented by a great number of species in tropical and subtropical America. A residence of four years (1899-1903) in central Texas, several excursions to the Trans Pecos deserts of that State, and a journey through New Mexico and Arizona during the spring of 1905, have enabled me not only to secure the large series of specimens now deposited in the American Museum of Natural History, but also to observe the living ants in their natural environment. This, as every myrmecologist knows, is often of the greatest importance in determining the status of species, subspecies and varieties.