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Photo#1639601
Aquatically-oriented nymph 1 - Microvelia

Aquatically-oriented nymph 1 - Microvelia
Durham County, North Carolina, USA
February 24, 2019
Size: under 2mm
Just trying to find a direction to look in to try and identify this little spud. Clearly at home on the water surface. Fairly certain it's immature. Thanks for your help!

Images of this individual: tag all
Aquatically-oriented nymph 1 - Microvelia Aquatically-oriented nymph 2 - Microvelia

Moved
Moved from True Bugs.

This is an apterous adult. You can tell by counting the number of tarsal segments* and also by fully developed naughty bits. Most keys to species for veliids rely on apterous adults, by the way. Winged adults can be difficult to ID unless you can associate them.

*Except for nymphs of Ochteridae, Saldidae and Leptopodidae, all aquatic and semi-aquatic nymphs will only have 1-segmented tarsi.

Microvelia

 
Excellent, thanks! Should I t
Excellent, thanks! Should I take it from the various images that they do not develop wings or elytra?

 
there are photos
in the guide of winged adults but I don't know that all species develop wings. I suspect most of the other photos, yours included, are of nymphs

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