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Family Tettigoniidae - Katydids

 
 
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Phymonotus jacintotopos: A new genus and species of shield-backed katydid (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Tettigoniinae: Nedubini...
By Lightfoot D.C., Weissman D.B., Ueshima N.
Zootaxa 2937: 49-65, 2011
Full title: Phymonotus jacintotopos: A new genus and species of shield-backed katydid (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Tettigoniinae: Nedubini) from the San Jacinto Mountains of California, USA

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A revision of the shield-back katydid genus Neduba (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Tettigoniinae: Nedubini)
By Jeffrey A. Cole, et al.
Zootaxa, 2021
A revision of the shield-back katydid genus Neduba (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Tettigoniinae: Nedubini)

JEFFREY A. COLE, DAVID B. WEISSMAN, DAVID C. LIGHTFOOT, NORIHIRO UESHIMA5, ELŻBIETA WARCHAŁOWSKA-ŚLIWA, ANNA MARYAŃSKA-NADACHOWSKA & WILL CHATFIELD-TAYLOR

Abstract: The Nearctic shield-back katydid genus Neduba is revised. Species boundaries were demarcated by molecular phylogenetic analysis, morphology, quantitative analysis of calling songs, and karyotypes. Nine previously described species are redescribed: N. carinata, N. castanea, N. convexa, N. diabolica, N. extincta, N. macneilli, N. propsti, N. sierranus, and N. steindachneri, and twelve new species are described: N. ambagiosa sp. n., N. arborea sp. n., N. cascadia sp. n., N. duplocantans sp. n., N. inversa sp. n., N. longiplutea sp. n., N. lucubrata sp. n., N. oblongata sp. n., N. prorocantans sp. n., N. radicata sp. n., N. radocantans sp. n., and N. sequoia sp. n. We chose a lectotype for N. steindachneri and transferred N. picturata from a junior synonym of N. diabolica to a junior synonym of N. steindachneri. Diversification in this relict group reflects cycles of allopatric isolation and secondary contact amidst the tumultuous, evolving geography of western North America. The taxonomy and phylogenies presented in this revision lay the groundwork for studies of speciation, biogeography, hybrid zones, and behavioral evolution. Given that one Neduba species is already extinct from human environmental disturbance, we suggest conservation priorities for the genus.

The rotundifolia complex of the genus Amblycorypha (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae): songs reveal new species
By Walker T.J., Forrest T.G., Spooner J.D.
Ann. Ent. Soc. Am. 96: 433-447, 2003

The uhleri group of the genus Amblycorypha (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae): extraordinarily complex songs and new species
By Walker T.J.
J. Orthoptera Res. 13: 169-183, 2004

The grasshoppers of Oklahoma (Orthoptera: Acrididae)
By Stanley Coppock Jr
Oklahoma State University, 1962

Cricket Radio: Tuning in the Night-Singing Insects
By John Himmelman
Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011

Guide to Night-Singing Insects of the Northeast
By Michael DiGiorgio & John Himmelman
Stackpole Books, 2009

Orthoptera of North-Eastern America
By W. S. Blatchley
The Nature Publishing Company, 1920
Old is not always bad. While it is seriously outdated (1920), most thorough and comprehensive single treatment of eastern US Orthoptera (and related insects) published is 'Orthoptera of North-eastern America' by W. S. Blatchley. Some subsets of the insects included in this book have been more recently treated in more depth, but not all together in one place.

The title is a bit misleading, because included are nearly all species then known to be found east of the Mississippi. Also, the definition of Orthoptera has changed over the years, and this book includes things such as Earwigs (Dermaptera), Roaches & Mantids (Dictyoptera), and Walkingsticks (Phasmatodea). It is well worth a search through libraries and used book shops if you are really interested in these insects. It does not have much in the way of illustrations (mostly drawings to aid in identification where necessary), but it is very interesting to read, with lots of discussion and detail. Each species is discussed at length and includes descriptions of the insect, habitat, life history when known, history, etc.

 
 
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