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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#164130
Crambid? - Goniapteryx servia

Crambid? - Goniapteryx servia
8 mi. SW of Wimberley, Comal County, Texas, USA
June 28, 2007
Size: ~2cm length
Was common here all summer/fall. Looked among the Crambids because it has quite a snout, but may have missed it. Antennae are normally swept back over body when its not, uh, napping. It has an arrow shaped dorsal profile.

Images of this individual: tag all
Dorsal view of #164130 - Goniapteryx servia Crambid? - Goniapteryx servia

Jason identified another image
as Goniapteryx servia, # 8544, see

 
#8544
Thanks so much; I'll use that id reference. As a note, however, out of dozens observed in '07, all had the white spot. Perhaps Vargo's 8544W was worn or there's geographic variation.

 
I realize the previous commen
I realize the previous comments here are years old, but I photographed one of these in Dripping Springs, Texas, last night. Images on iNat at:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/3123098#activity_comment_510563
also shows the white spot clearly.

 
Belize Moths also Have the White Spot
....these are the first live photos I've seen. I suppose it is possible that this is a dimorphic species, but fresh, living specimens often look different from not-so-fresh spread material.

 
Bob Patterson would
likely want to have some images for MPG. You might want to contact him if he doesn't comment here.

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