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Photo#164235
redwood forest mayfly - Siphlonurus spectabilis

redwood forest mayfly - Siphlonurus spectabilis
Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, Santa Cruz County, California, USA
May 25, 2007
Resting along a hiking trail above a stream.

Moved
Moved from Mayflies.

Siphlonurus spectabilis--female
Although I was fairly sure about the genus, uncovering the probable species required a process of elimination. Traver's original description of this species and Day's explanation of the synonymy of spectabilis and maria was based upon adult males (which have a somewhat variable orangish brown shading on the hindwings). It was a reference to this species in Provonsha and McCafferty's 1982 description of S. minnoi (sp.n.) that described the distinctive dark spot in the bullar region of the forewing in conjunction with the spot in the radial sector of the hindwing. According to Day, this is a rather common species in CA. (He collected specimens in 14 counties.)

Probably...
Siphlonurus. The costal angulation of the hindwing isn't clear (which means that I can't really rule out Ameletus), but there are species of Siphlonurus with similar spots on their wings. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find one that has the spot on the hindwing.

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