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Photo#1650335
red and black sawfly - Dolerus

red and black sawfly - Dolerus
Lake Meyer Park, Winneshiek County, Iowa, USA
April 9, 2019
Size: ~10 mm
I noticed there are a lot of red and black sawflies, but this one looked similar to some examples I found in the genus Dolerus, based mostly on the style of its antennae. It was feeding on some tree sap.

Images of this individual: tag all
red and black sawfly - Dolerus red and black sawfly - Dolerus red and black sawfly - Dolerus red and black sawfly - Dolerus red and black sawfly - Dolerus

Moved
Moved from Common Sawflies.

Selandriinae
This is Dolerus sp. Was it actively feeding on the tree sap? If so, I'm not sure that's an observation that's been made before!

 
Dolerus feeding on tree sap
Yes, Spencer, this sawfly was actively feeding on sap that was oozing out of a black cherry tree that had been gnawed by beaver. It spent at least 15 minutes slowly moving around as it fed.

Moved

 
Tenthredinidae
Thanks for putting this sawfly in Tenthredinidae, Ken! I thought that is where it belonged, but I wasn't 100% sure.

 
The antennae are the key.
Spend some time comparing the antennae of the various families and you'll soon be able to sort them out with confidence.

 
sawfly antennae as an ID aid
Thanks for your encouragement, Ken! I'm always afraid there may be a couple similar sawfly families and I make the wrong choice, though knowing I got this one right, in my own mind, helps a lot.

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