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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Critical notes on the species of Selenophorus of the United States.
By Horn, G.H.
Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 19(107): 178-183., 1880
Cite: 1654579 with citation markup [cite:1654579]
Full Text

Horn, G.H. 1880. Critical notes on the species of Selenophorus of the United States. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 19(107): 178-183.

Without wishing at the present time to discuss the question of the validity of Selenophorus as a genus distinct from Harpalus, I will only state that no characters lave yet been given which are permanent in all the species. Nevertheless it seems to be at least a well defined group in which there are three series of punctures or foveolae situated on the second, fifth and seventh elytral striae, a character which suggests a similar division of species in Pterostichus.

The Horn (1880) key to American Selenophorus species is outdated
and so it will be misleading to readers unfamiliar with the genus. The article misses several familiar species: S. granarius, discopunctatus, striatopunctatus, maritimus, planipennis to name just a few. In 1880 "Gynandropus" was still considered to be a genus and so the key misses members of the Selenophorus hylacis species-group. Horn's S. iripennis and S. subtinctus were subsequently moved to Amblygnathus. Horn's concept of S. ovalis Dejean is actually an undescribed species that is later named a new species by Messer & Raber (2021).(1)

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