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Photo#165502
Predacious Diving Beetle - Dytiscus cordieri

Predacious Diving Beetle - Dytiscus cordieri
Airdrie, Alberta, Canada
August 30, 2007
Size: ~ 3 cm
Found this beetle on the ground, somewhat randomly, on its back in front of our rental car in the parking lot. Brought back to the hotel and photographed in the sink.
A Dytiscus species, but I don't know which. Don't have a key on hand...

Images of this individual: tag all
Predacious Diving Beetle - Dytiscus cordieri Predacious Diving Beetle - Dytiscus cordieri

Thanks Tim!
The descriptions seem to match, and I see the species is relatively well-distributed in AB. I've moved my images to the species page for the time being. I should look for the Nearctic Dytiscidae key too. Last time I checked the library it was on hold.

D. codieri
is the closest I can get based on species descriptions on the U of A entomology online collection. See here to compare. It is also a male- the enlarged foretarsal pads used for gripping the female during mating are visible
I will be getting my copy of "Predaceous Diving Beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) of the Nearctic Region, with emphasis on the fauna of Canada and Alaska" soon via mail mainly to get my own dytiscid collection sorted out but hopefully some of the BG images can also be keyed out as well.

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