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Photo#166179
acorn moth - Pyroderces badia

acorn moth - Pyroderces badia
Knowland Park, Oakland, Alameda County, California, USA
December 27, 2007
Size: 5mm
December 27, 2007

This moth emerged from a coast live oak acorn I collected in November and kept in my (heated) house.

The moth doesn't look too good here because it was chilled for the photograph ... a little too much, but after a few more photos it flew off.

Images of this individual: tag all
acorn moth - Pyroderces badia acorn moth - Pyroderces badia

1513 - Pyroderces badia
Identified by Terry Harrison.

There are three species of this genus in eastern North America. P. badia was also known to Ronald W. Hodges (MONA Fascicle 6.1; 1978) to have a disjunct population in Orange County, California, where it flies from April to December.

 
Pyroderces badia
Thanks Bob!!! I didn't expect a species id on this, so this is great.

The CA Moth Database lists one specimen from Alameda County (northern CA), along with specimens from four southern CA counties including Orange County

Nice images!
How do these fragile creatures emerge from an acorn? I'm guessing the larva will bore a large enough hole to exit from before it pupates.

 
pre-existing holes?
The two moths I've gotten out of acorns both emerged from acorns that already had holes in them (that someone else might have made, ie. a weevil). However, I haven't been keeping track of the numbers of holes, so I'm not really sure if the moths came out of pre-existing holes or if they made their own.

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