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Photos of insects and people from the 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico, July 20-24

National Moth Week was July 23-31, 2022! See moth submissions.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Photos of insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12


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Family Buthidae

Striped Bark Scorpion - Centruroides vittatus Striped bark scorpion - Centruroides vittatus Scorpion - Centruroides sculpturatus Striped Bark Scorpion with Prey - Centruroides vittatus Arizona Bark? - Centruroides sculpturatus Striped Bark Scorpion - Centruroides vittatus Striped Bark Scorpion - Centruroides vittatus - female lil' critter - Centruroides vittatus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Chelicerata (Chelicerates)
Class Arachnida (Arachnids)
Order Scorpiones (Scorpions)
Family Buthidae
Pronunciation
BYOO-thih-dee; BYOO-thid (buthid) scorpions
Explanation of Names
Buthidae C.L. Koch 1837
Numbers
a single genus in our area; ~940 spp. in 56 genera total(1) (the largest scorpion family)
Identification
The family Buthidae is easily recognized by the almost triangular sternum. The sternum is located on the underside just before the pectines (combs).
Range
in warm climates on all continents except Antarctica
Remarks
Of the known 25 (or so) species of dangerous scorpions, only one (Hemiscorpius lepturus, Hemiscorpiidae) is NOT in this family. Dangerous buthids are in the genera Centruroides (North America and Mexico), Tityus (South America), and Androctonus; in the Old World, Parabuthus, Leiurus, Mesobuthus, and Hottentotta. Oddly, with all the venomous animals in Australia, none of the buthids there is known to be dangerous.