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Photo#16671
Small beetle with hitchhikers - Ips

Small beetle with hitchhikers - Ips
Greenfield, New Hampshire, USA
May 5, 2005
Size: ~4mm
In the National Audubon insect guide this looks like an Engraver Beetle (Ips sp.)with the clubbed antennae. And what are those tiny bugs on its back? They don't look like mites.

Moved

I support your ID
Hi Tom, to me it also looks like a species of Ips.

The small hikers are mites - I know this turtle-like kind, often found attached to Scoytines and wood-boring weevils.

cheers, Boris

Wow
Wow, what tiny hitch-hikers. They look for all the world like tiny beetles, but hey, the Bark and Ambrosia Beetle is small enough to begin with. They also look somewhat like hemipterans. I'd love to know what these were.

--Stephen

Stephen Cresswell
Buckhannon, WV
www.stephencresswell.com

 
Tiny hitchhikers
I just posted an enlarged picture of these tiny bugs to see if anyone knows what they are.

 
They are mites, the higher le
They are mites, the higher level classifications are a bit of a mess in this group, either way they belong in the Uropodoidea. I work on mites associated with bark beetles, so if anyone ever wants to send me uropodoids or other large bodied Mesostigmata I will be more than willing to take them.

 
Why not
leave some means of contact on your personal page (reachable by clicking on your name)?

 
done and done
done and done

Looks like family Scolytidae.
Looks like family Scolytidae. You're right, the hitchhikers are domed on top, flat on the bottom -- or at least one of them is. If you carry a pocket loupe with you in the field, sometimes you can determine what you're looking at.

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