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Photo#166797
Springtail? - Entomobrya clitellaria

Springtail? - Entomobrya clitellaria
Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, California, USA
January 13, 2008
Size: 2mm
This one is about 2mm long, 3mm if you include the forward appendages (antennas?). This one (the larger one) stepped onto this leaf from out of the water. It was fairly close to the other globular springtail, but they did not seem to interact. It then seemed to intentionally wade back into the water to continue its journey.

You got at double feature
Looks like you were able to catch two springtail species with one photo! :)

Entomobrya clitellaria + Sminthurides sp.
Indeed a springtail, Mac. With forward directed antennae.
Many springtails can walk onto the watersurface. The surface tension is strong enough to hold them. And many species have specially adapted feet that aren't wetted by the water. Some have a highly modified furca that allows them even to jump on the watersurface without penetrating the water surfacefilm.

 
I can say for certain the Sminthurides can jump on the water...
I'm not sure how the E. clitellaria does it. It may be that they are walking. Their posture seems like it, but photos of them on the water are normally blurry. possibly they are moving, or possibly I haven't got the right technique for getting better pictures.

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