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Photo#1669910
Santa Cruz Wasp Mimic Beetle - Strophiona tigrina

Santa Cruz Wasp Mimic Beetle - Strophiona tigrina
2mi S. Scott's Valley, Santa Cruz County, California, USA
May 26, 2019
Size: 14mm
On ground in afternoon.

Images of this individual: tag all
Santa Cruz Wasp Mimic Beetle - Strophiona tigrina Santa Cruz Wasp Mimic Beetle - Strophiona tigrina Santa Cruz Wasp Mimic Beetle - Strophiona tigrina

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
tigrina vs laeta?
If you have a minute to reply and don't mind elaborating on the ID... since both species occur in my region and I am having trouble finding a key I would love to get a couple pointers on the identifying features I should be looking at to tell the difference. Thanks!

 
tigrina vs. laeta
Supposedly, the two species are separable based on whether that anterior most black bar is transverse (straight across) or oblique (at an angle). Many specimens are clearly one way or the other, but yours isn't. I felt it was leaning towards being oblique (no pun intended...well, maybe it was). I have two specimens I've collected which I'd call S. tigrina and many hundreds of what I'd call S. laeta. Not a very good sample size for the former, but it seems to be a smaller beetle and less robust (wide) as the latter.

Some folks consider the two to be synonymous. See Phil Schapker's Lepturines of the Pacific Northwest (1). I just try to be consistent in how I ID the forms.

 
hahaha
That explains why I was so confused. I see why you would categorize mine as tigrina then and suspected it was that black bar but I felt it had to be something more qualitative when I asked. Thank you for the thorough explanation and the link!

 
Thanks!
I appreciate the quick species ID!

What a beauty! Thanks for sh
What a beauty! Thanks for sharing!

 
Excited to share!
I was happily surprised by this hairy shiny beauty hiding under my door.

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