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Family Leucospidae

Wasp ID? - Leucospis birkmani - female Wasp ID? - Leucospis birkmani - female Is this Leucospis affinis ? - Leucospis affinis - female wasp - Leucospis affinis Possible Leucospis from Cedar Hill, Texas - Leucospis birkmani - female Possible Leucospis from Cedar Hill, Texas - Leucospis birkmani - female Hymenopteran - Leucospis affinis - female Small Wasp? - Leucospis affinis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon ("Parasitica" (parasitic Apocrita))
Superfamily Chalcidoidea (Chalcidoid Wasps)
Family Leucospidae
Numbers
6 spp. in a single genus in our area, >130 spp. in 4 genera worldwide(1)
Size
4-17 mm
Identification
Usually black and yellow. They are stout insects, they fold wings longitudinally at rest and look a little like small yellowjackets. The ovipositor is long and curves forward and upward over the abdomen, ending over the posterior part of the thorax. Like the Chalcidids they have the hind femora greatly swollen and toothed on the ventral side.(2)
Food
parasitoids of aculeate Hymenoptera (mainly solitary bees, less frequently solitary wasps, e.g. Vespidae and Sphecidae)(1)
Life Cycle
Eggs are deposited externally on the host larva or nearby. The first instar larva does not feed at first but searches the host cell for competitors; only one parasitoid larva survives and develops as an ectoparasitoid sucking the body fluids of the host.(1)
Remarks
rather rare; may be found on flowers(3)
Internet References
Works Cited
1.Universal Chalcidoidea Database
2.A handbook of the families of Nearctic Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera). 2nd Edition
Grissell E.E., Schauff M. E. 1997. Ent. Soc. Wash. 87pp.
3.Borror and DeLong's Introduction to the Study of Insects
Norman F. Johnson, Charles A. Triplehorn. 2004. Brooks Cole.