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Photo#168017
Aulacidae - Pristaulacus occidentalis - male

Aulacidae - Pristaulacus occidentalis - Male
Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
September 3, 2007

Images of this individual: tag all
Aulacidae - Pristaulacus occidentalis - male Aulacidae ? - Pristaulacus occidentalis

Moved
Moved from Aulacidae.

Pristaulacus occidentalis (Cr
Pristaulacus occidentalis (Cresson)

Moved

I'd suggest a male Gasterupti
I'd suggest a male Gasteruptiidae. Definitely not a sphecid.

 
Thank-you
Thanks for setting me on the right track! It doesn't have an expanded hind tibia, though. Blew up a couple of the photos & looking at the wing veination, I'm wondering if it's more likely to be an Aulacidae species?

 
I think you're right
For the same reasons you quote.
Legs and forewing venation (e.g., bigger 1rst "discoidal" cell) match better with Aulacidae (a group closely related to Gasteruptiidae, whith the same "neck"-shaped prothorax). A male individual anyway, since Aulacid females too have a protruding, albeit short, ovipositor.
Thanks for sharing these excellent pictures.

 
Thank-you
Thanks for confirming, Richard.

 
I think you're right.
The venation does look a bit more complex than that of Gasteruptiidae. The spot in the wing is often a character in Aulacidae.

 
Ok
....I guess I'll move it to Aulacidae for now. Really appreciate your help!

 
Yes!
Male, probably in genus Pristaulacus. Great find!

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