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Photo#1685371
4- winged blue mud dauber - Chlorion aerarium

4- winged blue mud dauber - Chlorion aerarium
Pineville , Berkeley County, South Carolina, USA
June 22, 2019
Size: 3/4"
I found him dead and discovered by ants. He was fully intact when I first noticed him, but by the time I could get my phone, they had torn off one of the wings. This is the 2nd wasp I've seen around here with 4 fully developed wings. The other was actually a red wasp and it was alive. It landed on a white building, and I noticed it had its wings folded like normal, but they looked as if they were one wing split. Once I got close enough, it opened its wings and that's when I realized the wasp actually had 4 wings. It seemed to be able to move them individually to some degree. I've never seen or heard of a 4-winged wasp before, yet I have seen two. Evolution at work?

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

This looks like (probably) a Steel-blue Cricket Hunter, Chlorion aerarium. (widespread) This could be the first submission from South Carolina. Hold on for an expert.

Evolution
Almost all wasps & bees have four wings. Some wasps families & Velvet Ants have wingless female adults. The evolution of wings and halteres is very interesting. WELCOME TO BUGGUIDE!!!!!!!

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