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Photo#168791
Dolichovespula adulterina arctica - Dolichovespula arctica - female

Dolichovespula adulterina arctica - Dolichovespula arctica - Female
Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
July 29, 2007
D. maculata is common here, but have only seen this once. Understand that D. arctica occurs in our area. Two other photos of the same individual.

Images of this individual: tag all
Dolichovespula adulterina arctica - Dolichovespula arctica - female Dolichovespula arctica ?? - Dolichovespula arctica - female Dolichovespula arctica ?? - Dolichovespula arctica - female

Moved
Moved from Dolichovespula.

Dolichovespula adulterina arctica - female
Given the date, difficult to say whether this female was an "old timer" from 2006 or a young freshly emerged from a D. arenaria colony. On the one hand, wings are hardly - if any - wheathered, which suggests a young one. But on the other hand, gaster seems not "fat" enough for an indidual who will have to hibernate until following spring.
These pics are especially interesting, because they show that at least some members of the Western populations are clearly more similar to palaearctic D. adulterina adulterina than Eastern specimens. Indeed, had this female owned a greenish sulphur yellow rather than creamy white pattern, I'd thought she came from "my" Jura mountains.

 
Oh my...
all the way from the Jura mountains - didn't realise you were so far afield! Thanks so much. We live in a fairly small town - it's terrific to be able to learn from all this expertise.

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