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Family Culicidae - Mosquitoes

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Aedes albopictus in Memphis, Tennessee, (USA): An achievement of modern transportation?
By Reiter, P. and R.F. Darsie.
Mosquito News 44(3): 396-399., 1984
Full Text

Reiter, P. and R.F. Darsie. 1984. Aedes albopictus in Memphis, Tennessee, (USA): An achievement of modern transportation? Mosquito News 44(3): 396-399.

Abstract
Containerization and the Lighter Aboard Ship (LASH) concept have transformed the international shipping industry in the past decade. These technological advances and their potential significance to medical entomology are discussed in the light of the capture of an adult female Aedes albopictus in the center of Memphis, Tennessee.

Isolations of Cache Valley virus from Aedes albopictus (Culicidae) in New Jersey and its role as a region arbovirus vector.
By Armstrong et al.
Journal of Medical Entomology. 50(6): 1310-1314. , 2013
Full PDF

Armstrong, P.M., Anderson, J.F., Farajollahi, A., Healy, S.P., Unlu, I., Crepeau, T.N., Gaugler, R., Fonseca, D.M., and Andreadis, T.G. 2013. Isolations of Cache Valley virus from Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in New Jersey and evaluation of its role as a regional arbovirus vector. Journal of Medical Entomology. 50(6): 1310-1314.

ABSTRACT
The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), is an invasive species and a major pest problem in urban and suburban locales in New Jersey. To assess its potential role as an arbovirus vector, we sampled Ae. albopictus from two New Jersey counties over a 3-yr period and estimated the prevalence of virus infection by Vero cell culture and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. Three virus isolates were obtained from 34,567 field-collected Ae. albopictus, and all were identified as Cache Valley virus by molecular methods. Ae. albopictus (N  3,138), collected in Mercer County from late July through early September 2011, also were retested for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and all were negative. These results corroborate previous findings showing that Ae. albopictus may occasionally acquire Cache Valley virus, a deer associated arbovirus, in nature. In contrast, we did not detect WNV infection in Ae. albopictus despite concurrent WNV amplification in this region

Aedes albopictus in the United States: ten-year presence and public health implications.
By Moore, C.G. and C.J. Mitchell.
Emerging Infectious Diseases 3: 329-334., 1997
Full Text

Moore, C.G. and C.J. Mitchell. 1997. Aedes albopictus in the United States: ten-year presence and public health implications. Emerging Infectious Diseases 3: 329-334.

Abstract

Since its discovery in Houston, Texas, in 1987, the Asian "tiger mosquito" Aedes albopictus has spread to 678 counties in 25 states. This species, which readily colonizes container habitats in the peridomestic environment, was probably introduced into the continental United States in shipments of scrap tires from northern Asia.

Updated Distribution of Aedes albopictus in Oklahoma, and Implications in Arbovirus Transmission.
By Noden, B.H., L. Coburn, R. Wright and K. Bradley.
Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 31(1): 93-96., 2015
BioOne

Bruce H. Noden, Lisa Coburn, Russell Wright, and Kristy Bradley. 2015. Updated Distribution of Aedes albopictus in Oklahoma, and Implications in Arbovirus Transmission. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 31(1):93-96.

Abstract
A series of statewide surveys were conducted in Oklahoma in the summers between 1991 and 2004 to identify the distribution of Aedes albopictus. Adult mosquitoes were identified in 63 counties, bringing the currently known distribution of Ae. albopictus in the state to 69 of 77 counties.

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Trouble: Urban Sources of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) Refractory to Source-Reduction.
By Unlu et al.
PLoS ONE 8(10): e77999., 2013
Full PDF

Unlu I, Farajollahi A, Strickman D, Fonseca DM (2013) Crouching Tiger, Hidden Trouble: Urban Sources of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) Refractory to Source-Reduction. PLoS ONE 8(10): e77999.

Abstract (part)

Aedes albopictus larvae and pupae were found significantly more often than expected in medium volumes of water in buckets and plant saucers but were rarely collected in small volumes of water found in trash items such as discarded cups and cans. They were also absent from large volumes of water such as in abandoned swimming pools and catch basins, although we consistently collected Cx. pipiens from those habitats. The frequency of Ae. albopictus in tires indicated rapid and extensive use of these ubiquitous urban containers. Standard larval-based indices did not correlate with adult catches in BG-Sentinel traps, but when based only on Ae. albopictus key containers (buckets, plant saucers, equipment with pockets of water, and tires) they did. Although we found that only 1.2% of the 20,039 water-holding containers examined contained immature Ae. albopictus (5.3% if only key containers were counted), adult populations were still above nuisance action thresholds six times during the 2009 mosquito season. We conclude that in urban New Jersey, effective source reduction for Ae. albopictus control will require scrupulous and repeated cleaning or treatment of everyday use containers and extensive homeowner collaboration.

La Crosse virus in Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, Texas, USA, 2009.
By Lambert et al.
Emerging Infectious Diseases 16(5): 856-858., 2010
PubMed

Lambert AJ, Blair CD, D'Anton M, Ewing W, Harborth M, Seiferth R, Xiang J, Lanciotti RS. (2010) La Crosse virus in Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, Texas, USA, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases 16(5): 856-858.

Abstract
We report the arthropod-borne pediatric encephalitic agent La Crosse virus in Aedes albopictus mosquitoes collected in Dallas County, Texas, USA, in August 2009. The presence of this virus in an invasive vector species within a region that lies outside the virus's historically re

An Updated Checklist of the Mosquitoes of Oklahoma Including New State Records and West Nile Virus Vectors, 2003–06.
By Noden, B.H., L. Coburn, R. Wright and K. Bradley.
Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 31(4): 336-345., 2015
BioOne

Noden, B.H., L. Coburn, R. Wright and K. Bradley. (2015) An Updated Checklist of the Mosquitoes of Oklahoma Including New State Records and West Nile Virus Vectors, 2003–06. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 31(4): 336-345.

Abstract
A series of statewide surveys were conducted in Oklahoma in the summers between 1991 and 2004 to identify the distribution of Aedes albopictus. Adult mosquitoes were identified in 63 counties, bringing the currently known distribution of Ae. albopictus in the state to 69 of 77 counties.

The discovery and distribution of Aedes albopictus in Harris County, Texas.
By Sprenger D, Wuithiranyagool T.
Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 2: 217-219., 1986
Full PDF

Sprenger D, Wuithiranyagool T. 1986. The discovery and distribution of Aedes albopictus in Harris County, Texas. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 2: 217-219.

On August 2, 1985, numerous adults and larvae of an unknown species of Aedes were collected from several widely separated tire dumps, in and around the city of Houston, Texas.

A survey of Harris County was begun on August 22 to determine the frequency, abundance and distribution of Ae. albopictus in water-filled containers, especially tires.

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