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Family Culicidae - Mosquitoes

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New classification for the composite genus Aedes (Culicidae: Aedini), elevation of subgenus Ochlerotatus to generic rank...
By Reinert, J.F.
Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association, 16(3): 175-188., 2000
Full PDF (fixed)

Reinert, J.F. 2000. New classification for the composite genus Aedes (Diptera: Culicidae: Aedini), elevation of subgenus Ochlerotatus to generic rank, reclassification of the other subgenera, and notes on certain subgenera and species. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association, 16(3): 175-188.

ABSTRACT (part)
The composite genus Aedes is divided into 2 genera, Aedes and Ochlerotatus, on the basis of consistent primary characters of the female and male genitalia.

Keys to the larvae of Texas mosquitoes with notes on recent synonymy. II. Key to general and to the species of the genus Culex L
By Breland, O.P.
The Texas journal of science 5(1): 114-119., 1953
Breland, O.P. 1953. Keys to the larvae of Texas mosquitoes with notes on recent synonymy. II. Key to general and to the species of the genus Culex Linnaeus. The Texas journal of science 5(1): 114-119.

Hidden in plain sight: Cryptic and endemic malaria parasites in North American white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).
By Martinsen et al.
Science Advances, 2(2): e1501486., 2016
Full Text

Martinsen et al. 2016. Hidden in plain sight: Cryptic and endemic malaria parasites in North American white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Science Advances, 2(2): e1501486.

Abstract:
Malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium are diverse in mammal hosts, infecting five mammalian orders in the Old World, but were long considered absent from the diverse deer family (Cervidae) and from New World mammals. There was a description of a Plasmodium parasite infecting a single splenectomized white-tailed deer (WTD; Odocoileus virginianus) in 1967 but none have been reported since, which has proven a challenge to our understanding of malaria parasite biogeography. Using both microscopy and polymerase chain reaction, we screened a large sample of native and captive ungulate species from across the United States for malaria parasites. We found a surprisingly high prevalence (up to 25%) and extremely low parasitemia of Plasmodium parasites in WTD throughout the eastern United States. We did not detect infections in the other ungulate species nor in western WTD. We also isolated the parasites from the mosquito Anopheles punctipennis. Morphologically, the parasites resemble the parasite described in 1967, Plasmodium odocoilei. Our analysis of the cytochrome b gene revealed two divergent Plasmodium clades in WTD representative of species that likely diverged 2.3 to 6 million years ago, concurrent with the arrival of the WTD ancestor into North America across Beringia. Multigene phylogenetic analysis placed these clades within the larger malaria parasite clade. We document Plasmodium parasites to be common in WTD, endemic to the New World, and as the only known malaria parasites from deer (Cervidae). These findings reshape our knowledge of the phylogeography of the malaria parasites and suggest that other mammal taxa may harbor infection by endemic and occult malaria parasites.

Identification of Uranotaenia sapphirina as a specialist of annelids broadens known mosquito host use patterns
By L.E.Reeves, C.J.Holderman, E.M. Blosser, J.L.Gillett-Kaufman, A.Y.Kawahara, P.E.Kaufman, N.D. Burkett-Cadena
Comunications Biology, 2018

The global compendium of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence.
By Kraemer et al.
Scientific Data 2: 150035., 2015
Full Text

Kraemer et al. 2015. The global compendium of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence. Scientific Data 2: 150035.

Abstract
Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the main vectors transmitting dengue and chikungunya viruses. Despite being pathogens of global public health importance, knowledge of their vectors’ global distribution remains patchy and sparse. A global geographic database of known occurrences of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus between 1960 and 2014 was compiled. Herein we present the database, which comprises occurrence data linked to point or polygon locations, derived from peer-reviewed literature and unpublished studies including national entomological surveys and expert networks. We describe all data collection processes, as well as geo-positioning methods, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the first comprehensive global database of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence, consisting of 19,930 and 22,137 geo-positioned occurrence records respectively. Both datasets can be used for a variety of mapping and spatial analyses of the vectors and, by inference, the diseases they transmit.

Keys to the larvae of Texas mosquitoes with notes on recent synonymy. I. Key to general and to the species of the genus Aedes.
By Breland, O.P.
The Texas journal of science 4(1): 65–72., 1952
Breland, O.P. 1952. Keys to the larvae of Texas mosquitoes with notes on recent synonymy. I. Key to general and to the species of the genus Aedes. The Texas journal of science 4(1): 65–72.

The identity of Aedes bimaculatus (Coquillett) and a new subspecies of Aedes fulvus (Wiedemann) from the US (Culicidae),
By Ross, E.S.
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 45(6): 143-151., 1943
Full PDF

Ross, E.S. 1943. The identity of Aedes bimaculatus (Coquillett) and a new subspecies of Aedes fulvus (Wiedemann) from the United States (Diptera, Culicidae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 45(6): 143-151.

This paper presents evidence to show that two distinct species of Aedes occurring in the United States are both at present identified as Coquillett’s bimaculatus. The true bimaculatus, described from Brownsville, Texas, and ranging from central Texas to El Salvador, is very distinct from the “bimaculatus” collected throughout the southeastern United States which is here described as a new subspecies of the Neotropical fulvus (Wiedemann).

Competition and resistance to starvation in larvae of container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes.
By Barrera, R.
Ecological Entomology. 21(2): 117-127., 1996
Wiley Online Library

Barrera, R. 1996. Competition and resistance to starvation in larvae of container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes. Ecological Entomology. 21(2): 117-127.

Keywords:
Competition; species coexistence; starvation resistance; respiration; mosquito larvae; Aedes aegypti; Aedes albopictus; Aedes triseriatus.

Abstract.
1. Hypotheses about declining populations of container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes following the invasion by additional species were tested.

2. The larval competition hypothesis was studied experimentally in pure and mixed cultures of Aedes aegypti (L.), A.albopictus (Skuse) and A.triseriatus (Say). The experiments used decomposing leaf litter in the laboratory, as opposed to most previous research which used non-natural food.

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