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Photo#16948
Berosus sp., family Hydrophilidae - Berosus

Berosus sp., family Hydrophilidae - Berosus
Londonderry, HillsboroughRockingham County, New Hampshire, USA
May 15, 2004
Size: 5 - 7 mm?
This little guy was one of the noisiest beetles I've encountered, squawking frantically whenever I tried to pick him up.

Images of this individual: tag all
Berosus sp., family Hydrophilidae - Berosus Berosus sp., family Hydrophilidae - Berosus

Berosus
It is indeed in the genus Berosus...likely B. sayi or another of the 'larger' species. Not sure if by 'toes' you mean the long swimming hairs on the tarsi...these are very good swimmers.

 
Thanks for the ID!
Yes. I realize there are plenty of first-timers using this site who know nothing about insect anatomy, so I am periodically tempted to use terms that will be immediately understandable to them, even if incorrect. (How's that for spinning the fact I couldn't think of the proper term?)

Hydrophilidae.
Good job on the family ID! This might be a species of Berosus, which are indeed noted for their ability to "stridulate" (make noise by rubbing one body part against another) to communicate.

 
Much obliged
This specimen compares with none in Dillons. The extremely long "toes" are the principal trait I'm not seeing there, but nothing else lines up exactly either.

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