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Photo#1695009
Syrphid Fly - Pyrophaena granditarsis - Pyrophaena granditarsis

Syrphid Fly - Pyrophaena granditarsis - Pyrophaena granditarsis
Burton Wetlands, Geauga County, Ohio, USA
June 15, 2019
Size: 1/2

Images of this individual: tag all
Syrphid Fly - Pyrophaena granditarsis - Pyrophaena granditarsis Syphid Fly - Pyrophaena granditarsis - Pyrophaena granditarsis

Moved
Moved from Syrphid Flies.

Most probably but I am concerned b
Most probably but I am concerned by the markings on tergite 2 not being confluent (markings can be more restricted in females, however) and the hind femora being black as females have orange/yellow hind femora.
This may be an unusual form and I just can`t see anything else it could be.
Usually placed in Platycheirus, subgenus Pyrophaena now but still Pyrophaena on BugGuide.
I have sent it to Dr. Martin Hauser and Professor Jeff Skevington....

 
Pyrophaena rosarum
I think this is rosarum. It just has more extensive markings on tergite 2 than usual. A quick note on the genus: We treat Pyrophaena as part of Platycheirus in our field guide. However, Europeans treat it as a genus. We had some molecular data supporting the European concept. However, we now have a very large molecular dataset (1100 genes) that supports its treatment as a genus. However, note that there are no morphological characters that allow the genus to be recognized (other than keying out the species separately). The bottom line - it makes sense to continue to recognize it as a genus as currently done on Bugguide.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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